Sample Resume Format: I Did More Than My Job Title Required

Did you do more than just what your job title required? If so, how can you get credit for that extra experience on your resume? The short answer: Use a combination resume format.

A job seeker asked me a question (below) to that effect. I used a snippet from a sample resume format for a combination resume to show him how to highlight experience and skill sets a job title alone doesn't convey.

I Did More Than My Job Title Suggests

Susan,
I graduated from a US college three years ago, majoring in accounting. After working in a CPA firm in California as a staff accountant for a year, I went back to China and have been working in a furniture factory as a staff accountant. Unfortunately, the business is going down and now I am actively seeking a job with a US company.

I have always listed myself as a staff accountant in the factory. However, the fact is, I have been trained to manage different parts of the factory besides being an accountant (e,g., understanding how a merchandiser manages orders, and how materials are handled). How can I address all my responsibilities on my resume and make them sound professional?
- Kim

Sample Resume Format to Show Extra Skills

Kim,
You worked extra hard at your last job — doing more than what your job title required — and you deserve credit for that work. The new skills you learned are valuable in your job search. You just need to be sure they get noticed by the employer when he reads your resume.

A chronological resume format would highlight your job title, Staff Accountant. In a quick scan of your resume, the employer would assume that you handled the usual job duties of a staff accountant — no more. He won't know you went the extra mile in other areas unless he reads the "fine print" of your accomplishment statements.

A better way to market those extra skills is to use a combination resume format (a hybrid of the chronological and functional formats). The combination resume groups your accomplishment statements under skill headings, which are listed under your job title. This is an great way to highlight skills that reach beyond the scope of your job title.

Here's a section from a sample resume format for a combination resume. I inserted just a few terms so you could see what it might look like in your case:

Staff Account, 2010-present
ABC Company, City, State

Accounting
- An accomplishment statement that is relevant to your job objective.
- Another accomplishment that's relevant to your job objective.
- Another accomplishment that's relevant to your job objective.

Merchandise Management
- An accomplishment statement that is relevant to your job objective.
- Another accomplishment that's relevant to your job objective.
- Another accomplishment that's relevant to your job objective.

Production
- An accomplishment statement that is relevant to your job objective.
- Another accomplishment that's relevant to your job objective.
- Another accomplishment that's relevant to your job objective.

Be sure the skill headings under your job title are relevant to your job objective, and prioritize your skill sections so the most relevant one is first.

To get more ideas that might work for you, see Sample Resumes that Use the Combination Format.